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How would you hack the people on your network in 2024 is it still possible let's talk

pwnmaster123

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In the early days of WPA2 or even just a few years ago when Windows 11 was in its initial stages, hacking Wi-Fi networks and taking control of devices like laptops and phones through Man-in-the-Middle (MITM) attacks was relatively straightforward. As MITM attacks started to become less effective, attackers began combining ARP spoofing with other techniques like Beef-XSS injection and serving fake update payloads.

However, with modern security advancements, most popular websites now use HSTS (HTTP Strict Transport Security) and browsers have become much smarter, making simple attacks harder to execute. Even Windows Defender has become more robust, and the latest Remote Code Execution (RCE) vulnerabilities are often patched before they become publicly known.

Given these advancements, how would one go about hacking devices on their network or even their neighbor's phone just by being on the same network? Social engineering is undoubtedly a key component, but without physically accessing someone's phone or PC, how could one manipulate network traffic to install a malicious payload?

Even though we still have access to ARP spoofing, the impending arrival of WPA3 could spell the end of traditional network attacks. Let's brainstorm and invent new techniques to tackle these challenges in this chat.
 

K4NITEL

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how could one manipulate network traffic to install a malicious payload?
we can't manipulate the network to install our malicious payload until we got a proper big bug in system or browser...
Social engineering is undoubtedly a key component,
maybe only social engineering is effective in this scenario.
 

pwnmaster123

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Certainly, it is possible to hack a system using techniques like MITM and Evilgrade tool, which can be seen as social engineering. But what are the true limitations of hacking in this context?

For instance, the Bettercap tool can effectively sniff traffic. Additionally, if one has access to a router's admin panel, they could potentially change DNS settings, opening up further avenues for attack.

Given these possibilities, how far can these techniques be pushed? This is the question that intrigues me.
 
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